Architecture & urban design: Roy Strickland at TEDxEmbryRiddle

24/01/2014 16:41:31

Professor Roy Strickland has been the Director of the Master of Urban Design Program at the University of Michigan since the program's inception 12 years ago, following his work at Columbia University and MIT. Mr. Strickland's design work has been featured in the New York Times, the Rhode Island School of Design, and UCLA among others. He is former Associate Editor of the Harvard Architecture Review and currently serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of Places: Forum of Environmental Design. He received his B.A. from Columbia and his M.Arch. from MIT. Dr. Strickland's design philosophy revolves around the axiom that complex problems have elegant answers and his anecdotes will illustrate just that!

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Pio Cid

Excellent.

05/03/2016
Ike Okparaeke

Switching my major to Urban design next semester ;D

25/11/2015
fahad salama

Great. Just great.

24/08/2015
biskwikman

Geez this is dull.

20/07/2015
santino santino

One of the worst Instructor out there in the planet. Trust me on this one.

30/05/2015
IdiosoAmericano

This guy is the type of dude to come up to you and say "Your a wizard [insert name here]".

23/10/2014
Cihan Baysal

In democratic countries it is the people who decide about the future of their cities and who participate in the planning., not ‘’The sponsor’’.  We do not know and do not have the miniscule idea of who ‘’The Sponsor’’ is.  We would be more than happy if the name is disclosed.

It is a well known reality that a road calls a road and so does a settlement. Already plundered by 3rd Bridge constructions,Istanbul will be losing much more of its green plots, water basins, endemic plants, wildlife due to new settlements, commercial centers, entertainment centers and what else sprouting in the environs of this star project.

.The city has already run out of its water due to crowded population and constructions  and have been using the water supplies of neighbouring cities. What is the logic of bringing another 3 million to a city already over its natural thresholds? For months there has been no rain in the city, no cloud can visit a city destroying  3-4  million trees for the 3rd Bridge, devastating its green fields .

Constructing a luxurious site of safety against the earthquake solely for upper income groups, comprising  only 3 million,people is an outright discrimination and violation of the right to live. In a city of 20 million,awaiting a fatal earthquake, I do not think you are proposing to save only the rich who can afford to buy from this star project?

 If earthquake is the concern why not get concerned for the 20 mil Istanbullites? The state can very well use this money for  strengthening the housing stock of the people of İstanbul, 70% of whom live in informal neighbourhoods. This project is another one where earthquake threat is exploited to construct legitimacy for a profitable housing project.In the last years, we have had enough of them while nothing  has been done against the earthquake. 

Furthermore, scientifically and also according to the Turkish administrative Law, mining areea are considered as forest areas; for they can very well be turned into  forests.These areas are rented to private companies for a period of time and afterwards trees are planted. Near Yeniköy village in the vicinity of the 3rd Airport, the authorities forested such an area, you are welcome to see it but you have to be quick for hundreds of treees planted in the last 10 years are being cut down now for the 3rd Airport project. 

If wisdom and conscience do not abide,,ecocide and urbancide will close the curtain soon.. Istanbul will turn into a hell ,depleting its own air, water, green, agriculture,wildlife, endemic plantation and people and, in the last stage of this mockery, itself indeed!  Recalling the last days of Pompei.

13/02/2014
Cihan Baysal

Having visited Istanbul a number of times, Strickland should better know that his project targets an area of upmost value for the city, because
1. of its forests. Only for the controversial bridge an estimated 3 million trees will have to be cut. The area at the Black Sea is Istanbul's fresh air channel; it's lung.
2. of its natural resources, especially water basins are located in Istanbul's North. Further development and growth in the north of the city therefore endangers the water supply of a 15 milion city. 
3. of its threatened species. The new Istanbul project will destroy Bogazici key-biodiversity area in which there are 18 endemic plants and 13 of them are globally threatened plants, one globally threatened reptile species, one endemic and globally threatened butterfly lives.

As academics and professionals, we probably share with you the conviction that
1. A 3 million city cannot be built without extensive research about the effects and side effect of such a project. An Msc student project is very unlikely to master this task. Cities are no playgrounds and we are sure you agree that especially the future planners and urban designers should get a sense of “responsible design” in their education.
2.   Such a harsh intervention into a city cannot be decided without the local authorities and the population of the city via the civil society and institutions. This is against any democratic conviction.

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